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"It is a curious thing, the death of a loved one. We all know that our time in this world is limited, and that eventually all of us will end up underneath some sheet, never to wake up. And yet it is always a surprise when it happens to someone we know. It is like walking up the stairs to your bedroom in the dark, and thinking there is one more stair than there is. Your foot falls down, through the air, and there is a sickly moment of dark surprise as you try and readjust the way you thought of things."

- Lemony Snicket (via dontcallmesmall)

(via baldryangosling)

Source: dontcallmesmall
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"Do you ever wish you had a second chance to meet someone for the first time?"

- Unknown (via stevenbong)

(via baldryangosling)

Source: little-roro
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"Men can starve from a lack of self-realization as much as they can from a lack of bread."

- Richard Wright, Native Son (via purplebuddhaproject)

(via thewitofastaircase)

Source: purplebuddhaproject
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jaded-mandarin:

Peter Paul Rubens. The Fall of the Damned, 1620.

(via caravaggista)

Source: jaded-mandarin
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The Mystery of Time’s Arrow -By Julian Barbour- Issue 9: Time - Nautilus

wildcat2030:

As conscious beings, we are constantly aware of the relentless march of time. You can make an egg into an omelet, but you can’t turn an omelet back into an egg. Dropped glasses shatter and do not reassemble themselves. Above all, we age and become decrepit; there is no return to youth. But this is a great scientific mystery. There is nothing in the form of the laws of nature at the fundamental microscopic level that distinguishes a direction of time. They are time-symmetric. But the behavior of macroscopic objects around us is subject to the famous second law of thermodynamics, according to which disorder (as measured by entropy) always increases with time. This puts a direction, or arrow, of time into phenomena. The classical studies by Maxwell and Boltzmann in the second half of the 19th century assumed the existence of atoms and showed, on the basis of reasonable laws, that non-uniform distributions of atoms would always have a tendency to be washed out into a state with a uniform temperature distribution. This initial work took no account of gravity. Gravity presents many puzzles because it gives rise to “anti-thermodynamic” behavior: Under its influence, uniformly distributed matter tends to break up into clusters. As of now, no one knows how to describe this behavior using an entropy-type concept. This is all the more puzzling because Einstein’s wonderful theory of gravity—his general theory of relativity—does show that when black holes form they do have thermodynamic properties and possess a colossal entropy. What no one has been able to do is define gravitational entropy for the rest of the universe.

Source: wildcat2030
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earlymodernart:

James McNeill Whistler - Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket, 1874

(via caravaggista)

Source: earlymodernart